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Charles Sarno, PhD

Charles Sarno, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Holy Names University, where he has taught since 2000. Dr. Sarno holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History from Boston College and a Master of Arts Degree in Sociology from Harvard University. He earned his Doctorate in Sociology from Boston College.

While at HNU Dr. Sarno has taught a variety of sociology courses, including Introductory Sociology, Research Methods, Contemporary Families, Global Perspectives, Social Inequality and Racial/Ethnic Issues. His main academic interests include the sociology of religion and deviant behavior.

His current research and writing is on the Family Radio network, whose founder Harold Camping predicted the end of the world several times, most notably for May 21, 2011.

Dr. Sarno’s recent article “Church, Sect, or Cult?: The Curious Case of Harold Camping’s Family Radio” was selected for the 2016 Thomas Robbins Award for Excellence in the Study of New Religious Movements by the journal Nova Religio.

From July 2017-June 2019 Professor Sarno served as the Founding Dean of the School of Business and Applied Social Sciences.

Publications

Sarno, Charles. (2017) “Qualitative Designs and Data Collection: Understanding What Behavior Means in Context.” Wrote Chapter 11 for Introduction to Research Methods: A Hands-On Approach by Bora Pajo. Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

Sarno, Charles & Helen Shoemaker. (2016) “Church, Sect or Cult?:  The Curious Case of Harold Camping’s Family Radio Organization.” Nova Religio 19(3):6-30.

Sarno, Charles; Shestakofsky, Benjamin; Shoemaker, Helen; & Rebecca Aponte (2015) “Rationalizing Judgment Day: A Content Analysis of Harold Camping’s Open Forum.”  Sociology of Religion 76(2) 199-221